Graphic Design Vocabulary – Knowing Your software 2

graphic design software

 

 

A couple of weeks ago we started talking about terms, vocabulary or jargon on the various graphic design software. Today we are going to learn a little bit about another Adobe software, Adobe Illustrator.

AI

Adobe Illustrator is a great program for drawing vector-based graphics. You can create illustrations, diagrams, and other forms of artwork.

  • first developed for Apple Macintosh in December 1986
  • Primary used for vector drawing

Lets now learn some vocabulary words for Adobe Illustrator.

Anchor point – a point on a path that indicates a change of direction.

Art board – printable portion of the work area, where illustrations can be finalized.

Bezier Curve – A mathematically generated curve that has two endpoints and control points to specify curve direction.

Bounding box – a temporary frame around a selected object that shows the object’s outer dimensions.

Brush— A selected brush determines the appearance of a path’s stroke. Brushes are stored in the Brushes palette, and sets of brushes can be loaded and saved.

Closed path – Vector paths that are continuous and have no ends; the beginning and end points are the same.

Constrain – to force and object to take a certain form.

Corner pointe – an anchor point where a path changes direction in an angle rather than smoothly.

Dock – A location in the application window where a panel or panels are secured so they do not float.

Fill – characteristics of the inner area of an object, such as the color, pattern, style inside and object.

Marquee – Rectangle drawn around an object with a tool to select an area.

Open path – Vector paths that have two ends; the beginning and end points are not the same.

Panel – A group of related commands and options.

Path – The line that forms the shape of an object.

Point of origin – The point on which an object rotates or transforms. The point of origin may be within the object or outside it.

Shear – To slant or skew an object from its original orientation.

Smooth Point – an anchor point that connects path segments in a smooth curve.

Stroke – Characteristics of the outline of an object, such as its weight, color, style.

Are any of these words new for you? Next week we will see and learn a little bit more about Adobe Illustrator.

Done with the brushes in Illustrator

After a bunch of weeks working with the Brushes Panel in Illustrator, I will close this series with some simple a basic tips that you should never forget when working with brushes.

Saving Brushes

Now that you have create a bunch of new brushes, you might want to save them so you can access them from any new document you create. To save the brushes, click the Brush Libraries Menu and select Save Bushes. Name the brushes, and next you need them Click the Brush Libraries Menu, then choose your brushes under the User Defined section.

Best Practices and Tips

  • Use Scatter Brushes to quickly fill a page with random looking art.
  • If you need to edit on instance of a brush, use the Stoke Options button from the Brush Panel. You can make changes to a certain brush stroke without affecting the other strokes.
  • You cannot use gradients in brushes, but you can use blends. You can create a blend that looks like a gradient and create a brush out of it.

I hope you enjoy this series as much as I did. What did you learned from this series and what other tips you can advise to our readers?

Pattern Brush in Illustrator

Welcome back to our Illustrator Brush series, so far we have learn about Calligraphic Brush, Scatter Brush, Art Brush and today we will work with the Pattern Brush.

Defining a Pattern Brush

Pattern brushes are arguably the most difficult to master. A Pattern Brush can consist of five different pattern swatches. You can use different artwork for the start, finish, side (center), inside corner, and outside corner. Creating a Pattern Brush with five pattern swatches requires you to create some pattern tiles. I will first go over creating a simple Pattern Brush then explain how to create a Pattern Brush with multiple pattern swatches.

  1. Create some artwork for the Pattern Brush. Gradients and Effects cannot be used when creating a Pattern Brush.
  2. Select all the created artwork and drag it into the Brush Panel. When the New Art Brush dialog opens select New Pattern Brush from the options, to bring up the Pattern Brush Options.
  3. Change the name of the brush if you wish.
  4. Scale: The Scale determines how big or small the art is drawn on the path, relative to the size of the art.
  5. Spacing: The Spacing determines the amount of spacing between the art.
  6. Flip Along and Flip Across: These check boxes allow you to flip the art over the horizontal and vertical axis.
  7. Fit: The Stretch to Fit Options makes a perfect fit across the entire path. The Add Space to Fit changes the spacing of the art so it fits evenly across the entire path. The Approximate Path option changes the path so it fits with the art.
  8. Colorization: The Colorization options are the same as the previous brush options.

Adding Multiple Swatch Pattern

You can create a Pattern Brush with multiple swatches to create banners, picture frames, and much more

  1. Create some artwork for the Pattern Brush. Gradients and Effects cannot be used when creating a Pattern Brush.
  2. Define each separate element as an individual pattern swatch by dragging each element in to the Swatch Panel one at a time. It helps to name the pattern swatch after you created it. To do this, double-click on the swatch in the Swatch Panel and renaming it.
  3. Click New Brush from the Brush Panel and select new Pattern Brush from the New Brush dialog. This will open up the Pattern Brush Options.
  4. To add the swatch to the particular part of the path (start, finish, side (center), inside corner, and outside corner), click on the corresponding thumbnail at the top of the Pattern Brush Options dialog. Once selected you can choose the appropriate pattern swatch from the list.
  5. Follow the rest of the options for creating a simple Pattern Brush and you will have a multi-swatch Pattern Brush.

Edit Pattern Brush

To edit a preexisting Art Brush, double-click on the particular brush in the Brush Panel to bring up the Art Brush dialog.

Now that we have seen the basic brush panels in Illustrator, we can work in lots of new projects and explore more of this amazing software.

More Brush Panel tools in Illustrator

We have already seen how to work with the Calligraphic Brush, the Scatter Brush and today we will learn a little bit of the basics for the Art Brush.

Defining an Art Brush

Illustrator already has several preset Art Brushes, but you can use the following steps to create an new Art Brush.

  1. Create some artwork for the Art Brush. Gradients and Effects cannot be used when creating a Art Brush.
  2. Select all the created artwork and drag it into the Brush Panel. When the New Art Brush dialog opens, select New Art Brush from the options, to bring up the Art Brush Options.
  3. Change the name of the brush if you wish.
  4. Direction: The Direction setting sets the orientation of the art in relation to the path to which the brush us applied. Select one of the four arrow to change this option. The blue arrow that appears in the preview area allows you to see how the art will be drawn on a path.
  5. Width: Change this value to define how large the art will display in relation to the path to which the brush is applied. For the most part you want to check the Proportional box to keep the height-to-width ration unchanged as you scale the object to which the brush is applied.
  6. Flip Along and Flip Across: These check boxes allow you to flip the art over the horizontal and vertical axis.
  7. Colorization: The Colorization options are the same as the Scatter Brush options.
  8. Click OK to save your new Art Brush.

Edit Art Brush

To edit a preexisting Art Brush, double-click on the particular brush in the Brush Panel to bring up the Art Brush dialog.

Got it? Next week we will be working with the Pattern Brush.